Gravel (Xbox One Review)

This generation has blessed us with an abundance of excellent driving games – DriveClub was an extremely solid title, Gran Turismo made a pretty successful return and both Forza series continue to set the standard for console racing sims. However, what I’ve been missing is something that harkens back to my days in the local arcades playing Sega Rally – something a little more arcade-like in a rally setting.
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Mulaka (Playstation 4 Review)

You are Mulaka, a Tarahumara shaman warrior – Sukurúame. Armed only with your spear and the gift of second sight, you must commune with the five great animal demigods, face off against some of Northern Mexico’s most fearsome mythical creatures, and stand up to a growing evil. With little warning, you begin your pilgrimage, doing good deeds and collecting Kórima along the way.
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Turok 2: Seeds of Evil (Xbox One Review)

Turok: Dinosaur Hunter was one of the N64’s most popular titles. And with that success there would no doubt be a successor, Turok 2: Seeds of Evil. It trumps Turok: Dinosaur Hunter in nearly every regard, and for many that was a feat and a half. But with great strides towards creating a higher quality of game comes fallibility, and Turok 2 isn’t free of imperfections.
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Attack on Titan 2 (Xbox One Review)

Imagine your life is completely changed because of one event. You’re walking down the street, living your life, nothing out of the ordinary ever happens. Then all of a sudden, a series of events so catastrophic begin, leaving you with nothing but determination and a thirst for revenge.
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True Fear: Forsaken Souls – Part 1 (Playstation 4 Review)

I’m back on the horror puzzle train as I made my way through the point and click horror game from Goblinz, True Fear: Forsaken Souls. True Fear was originally released on Steam back in October 2016 but has recently seen release on consoles back in February of this year.
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Yakuza 6: The Song of Life (PlayStation 4 Review)

A brand new Yakuza release is like taking a vacation back to visit some friends in an old, familiar town. Almost annually, the cityscape changes with new developments. Your old friends have been busy, and it’s nice to catch up. Maybe we’ll even get caught up in their hijinks, or maybe we’ll just spend some time bonding at the karaoke. Whatever the case, some things have changed a little with Yakuza 6: The Song of Life. There’s a sombre air surrounding the familiar town of Kamurocho. It’s uncertain if we’ll be back here, because our friends are now moving on and this is the last time we’ll see them.
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Turok: Dinosaur Hunter (Xbox One Review)

Nostalgia can be a wicked vice. Reflecting back on fond memories of Turok: Dinosaur Hunter on the N64 brought on an uncontrollable childlike excitement, and being able to revisit the Lost Lands of Turok in HD was an opportunity I simply couldn’t pass up. But only when my nostalgia had been satiated and the Lost Lands free of evil warlords did I question how Turok would be received by those who did not experience Turok in its glory days.
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The Council: The Mad Ones (Xbox One Review)

There are long running theories that there is a marionette of world politics, someone–or something–lurking behind the scenes manipulating everything as we know it. In games, the idea of Oz revealing himself is often reserved as a last minute reveal, but in The Council, it’s just a side story to a much more personal inquisition. An inquisition that, sinks its teeth deep and leaves you begging for more.
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Secret of Mana (Playstation 4 Review)

Secret of Mana came out on the Super Nintendo back in 1993, enjoying critical and commercial success riding off the success of the original Final Fantasy. Thanks to its solid gameplay, the introduction of the active battle system and its outstanding graphics, it’s still considered one of the greatest games of the 90s. Square Enix are apparently digging through the archives right now, so it’s a good time to get out those nostalgia goggles and see if this remaster is worth the effort.
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Monster Hunter World (PlayStation 4 Review)

Sleepless nights. That’s what Capcom’s latest iteration and quasi-reboot of the niche and addictive Monster Hunter franchise has cost me. Monster Hunter World is the first western home console release for the series since 2010’s Monster Hunter Tri on the Nintendo Wii, and it’s clear audiences have been starving for it. As of this writing, World is already the fastest selling Capcom title in history. It’s actually rather astounding. So, what exactly is the draw?
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Dynasty Warriors 9 (Xbox One Review)

The murder of Julius Caesar has always been regarded as the pinnacle of betrayal and Brutus is often regarded as the main perpetrator, but he didn’t do it alone. In fact, there was a team of well-intentioned Romans behind every twist of the knife. Dynasty Warriors 9 is kind of like that: every little change and design choice, a new wound in Caesar’s back with the hope of overcoming a powerful empire.
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Into The Breach (PC Review)

On 14 September 2012, indie studio Subset Games saw the release of their debut video game FTL: Faster Than Light on Steam. The sci-fi roguelike game, which features the work of just 6 people, took the gaming world by storm thanks to its accessible gameplay and immensely rewarding skill curve and learning process.
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Past Cure (Xbox One Review)

If I could use one word to describe Past Cure, it would be perplexing. It really feels like the developers Phantom 8 Studio tried to create a mesmerising story with lots of questions that would keep players hooked, breaking away from the confines of small indie game development and trying to score a home run at making a relativistic AAA title. All of which would come crashing down in an instant as the garbled criss-cross of ideas, broken story, and mostly horrible gameplay would take precedence over the developers underlying intent, putting Past Cure in an unfavourable and unrecoverable position.
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Immortal Redneck (Xbox One Review)

As time moves forward and games themselves become more profound, we as gamers can’t help but look backwards to the past were our love for gaming ignited. Be it dungeon crawling through the pixelated worlds of Zelda, crate smashing and hog riding in Crash Bandicoot or even gibbing with the best of them in some Quake deathmatch. While most developers adhere to pushing the limits of game development by creating exhaustively large and complex worlds to explore and creating enveloping narratives to get lost in, some developers tread backwards. Such as developer Crema with their game Immortal Redneck. And I love them for it.
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Shadow of the Colossus (Playstation 4 Review)

In 2005, Shadow of the Colossus was released on the PS2. The spiritual successor to Ico was a revelation, both a commercial and critical success, but its legacy was what made the original release so important. Team Ico created a game that changed the way people looked at video games. For the first time, we saw a game which was considered not only as a piece of entertainment, but as art.
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Yakuza 6: The Song of Life (PlayStation 4 Preview)

It’s been three years since the events of Yakuza 5—both in real life and within the game. Okay, so, maybe it’s actually closer to two years in real life for everyone in the west, but that’s beside the point. In Yakuza 6: The Song of Life, we’ll be saying farewell to the main and beloved protagonist of the franchise, Kazuma Kiryu. A lot has changed for the now familiar characters and city of the Yakuza series, so it makes sense that we’ll be seeing major changes reflected in the gameplay as well.
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The Station (Xbox One Review)

It’s amazing how games can frequently rattle our brains with complex puzzles, intricate designs and complicated story telling. But when it comes to the finer details, such as background noise or set dressing, our minds become complacent; not wanting to focus on the specifics of a scene or moment, but rather to look toward the main event and ignoring the lesser details that surround us.
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Wulverblade (Xbox One Review)

Wulverblade doesn’t quite scratch my side-scrolling, beat’em up itch. Its graphic design is amazing and storytelling superb, although the core gameplay suffers from lack of diversity and combat feels wholly gritty and intense but what it lacks is any depth. And it just isn’t hitting the mark.
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UNDER NIGHT IN-BIRTH Exe:Late[st] (Playstation 4 Review)

The saying “better late than never” is one you might have to become familiar if you’re a Western fan of French Bread’s Under Night In-Birth series. The long awaited update to EXE: Late has finally reached European shores after being released in Japan for over half a year. If you’re brand new to the series, anime fighters or even fighting games as a whole; don’t worry, because EXE:Late (st) makes certain to cover all bases for all types of players.
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Mutant Football League (Xbox One Review)

Have you ever found yourself watching a game of American Football and found yourself feeling like there was just something missing? Amidst the roar of the crowd, you felt like there could maybe be more…blood and explosions?
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Vampyr (Playstation 4 Review-In progress)

Monday, June 4, 2018

The non-sparkling kind.

Dark Souls: Remastered (Xbox One Review)

Friday, June 1, 2018

It feels like there isn’t a month that goes by without a remaster, be it an old school title or an up-scaled port of a more recent game…

Bloodstained: Curse Of The Moon (Playstation 4 Review)

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Crowd-funded games have gone to staggering heights and plummeting lows in terms of overall success and reception. In the case of Koji Igarashi’s spiritual successor to Castlevania, things…

Omensight (Playstation 4 Review)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Omensight has heart, it’s a story full war and strife with no clear villain – going as far to show both sides of the story when apt. So…